AmblesideOnline in Canada, Years One to Six (Revised 2020)

"When the CBC is instructed by Parliament to do what it can to promote Canadian unity and identity, it is not always realized that unity and identity are quite different things to be promoting, and that in Canada they are perhaps more different than they are anywhere else." (Northrop Frye)

"Canada began as an obstacle, blocking the way to the treasures of the East, to be explored only in the hope of finding a passage through it." (Northrop Frye)

Click for: Year 0 - Year 1 - Year 2 - Year 3 - Year 4 - Year 5 - Year 6
Years 7-12 is on a separate page: Year 7 - Year 8 - Year 9 - Year 10 - Year 11 - Year 12
Suggestions for Picture Study and Composer Study

Part One: Introduction

The first version of AO's Canada page was created when we were barely into the new millennium. Since that time, the curriculum has changed; books and sources and technology have changed; and the world and our country have also changed. AO tends to take a long view of history and literature; celebrating the past is a big part of what we do. But it's important to balance the classic with the current, and to continue to look critically at both older resources, which may promote cultural stereotypes, or simply be out of date; and newer ones, which may either reek of political correctness, or simply not measure up to the best literary standards. There are many, many websites and commercial resources designed for Canadian school and home educators. Some of them will be useful to educators following Charlotte Mason's philosophy, and some will be less so. And in some cases, like Charlotte Mason, we will (still, after almost twenty years) recommend certain less-than-ideal books because of important content or for other reasons. Perhaps in another twenty years we will have discovered better ones!

This updated page will begin with general topics, and then provide suggestions for specific AO years and/or subjects. We are indebted to many who have posted their recommendations and discoveries on the Canadian section of the AO Forum (and encourage people to continue to do so!). The two problems with including resources provided by so many users are that, first, none of us have been able to personally try out or use every history book etc.; and, second, that you may purchase recommended resources and discover that they do not meet your family's values or needs. The best book for children in Charlottetown may not be the best for those in Vancouver. So, please, do borrow, preview, sample, price, ask questions before committing to an unknown book. And let us know what has worked well for you (and what hasn't).

Canada's First Nations and Multiculturalism

This is a sensitive issue, and seems to be constantly growing more so. For Canadians of European background, resources which seem (to us) to contain a balanced view of aboriginal (or any minority) issues may not be viewed in the same way by those coming from other perspectives. Stories told by even well-informed and perceptive outsiders are still those told by outsiders, and some of us may be surprised when we're told, or we realize ourselves, that our favourite books come up short or send messages that we hadn't intended. For example, a long-unquestioned early-years focus in Canadian history is European exploration, particularly by the "Big-C" group: Cabot, Cartier, and Champlain, and the establishment of forts and towns in New France. What does that narrative mean to us as adults from various backgrounds (including those whose families came to Canada more recently)? What is the message that it communicates to our children? Do we need to add more to the story, and what amount of "study" is appropriate for younger or older students? How should we do that? (I put "study" in quotation marks because that might include any sort of real-life experiences and the use of local cultural resources, not just books.)

Another example of traditional content but whose history is not always seen as positive now is the story of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. For many Canadians, this is an important and symbolic part of our country's history, a good thing to share with young children. For others, that story carries negative connotations. Even our first Prime Minister is currently unpopular with many people. While we do not need to load young children's education with controversy over every event and every "hero," we should not forget that government actions did not benefit all groups equally. Canadian home educators must have an awareness of current issues so that we can be discerning in our own reading and in our book choices for children (as well as gaining empathy for groups other than our own).

Two recommended sources for self-education in this area would be Canadian public libraries (because most libraries provide educational materials, learning kits, and booklists, or at least can point us to sources of information); and the First Nations themselves (through websites, local events, books, etc.).

History and Literature

(See also notes under specific years.)

Several out-of-print history textbooks have been used and recommended by AO users. There is a joke among us that all history books are called either Canada's Story or The Story of Canada, but it does seem to be true, so check authors carefully.

A popular textbook used in public schools is The Story of Canada by Christopher Moore, Janet Lunn, and Alan Daniel (illustrator). This has gone through various editions and is still (at this writing) in print. While it is appealing to have such a large, attractive, CURRENT history textbook, we have found that the book has certain drawbacks for Charlotte Mason educators. In many places, it seems to move too quickly, which makes it difficult to use for narrations. One use we have found for it is as a supplement or substitute at the end of Year 5 (or when World War I is studied) and then in Year 6, to provide an overview of 20th century Canadian history.

The historical biographies from the old series Great Stories of Canada are often recommended for specific time periods. These are by different authors and can vary in quality and acceptability. The much newer Dear Canada diary-style series has also met with mixed reviews: some of the books are better than others in both accuracy and literary quality. Parents of sensitive children might also want to preview the Dear Canada books, as the topics (such as the Halifax Explosion and the 1918 influenza epidemic) are sometimes described quite graphically.

Nature Study and Science

Nature study is a great place to learn about Canada, your province or territory, and your own region. There are classic older resources and also new ones: public libraries are a good place to browse, in both the adult and children's sections. The old textbook Natural Science Through the Seasons by J.A. Partridge ($) was originally written for Ontario teachers, became very popular a few years ago with homeschoolers, and has now been reprinted. A newer series of books is the Nature All Around trilogy by Pamela Hickman, published by Kids Can Press: Bugs ($), Plants ($), Trees ($), Birds ($).

The Canadian concept of "summer at the cottage" lends itself to topics such as astronomy, lakes, trees, geology, etc. Kids Can Press has published helpful guides (The Kids Cottage Book; Kids Book of the Night Sky) for kids discovering the out-of-doors during summer vacation. A newer title is Get Outside: The Kids Guide to Fun in the Great Outdoors, by Jane Drake and Ann Love ($). Many Scouting/Guiding resources would have similar activities.

Geography

Year 1's Paddle-to-the-Sea is one book not to be missed! Along the same lines: Hold on, McGinty by Nancy Hartry ($). There are only a few geography titles listed here, but we may expand that later. In the meantime, the Canadian Geographic website has a "kids" section which may offer inspiration.

Folklore, Songs, and Other Canadian Things

The book The Spirit of Canada, edited by Barbara Hehner, is used throughout the elementary years. ($) (Online at archive.org)

Holidays and Special Days

Canada Day: Many families won't be doing school on July 1, but it can still be a good chance for informal learning, especially through field trips to historic sites (many of them are free on the holiday).

If you live in Newfoundland, you will probably observe Memorial Day on July 1st instead.

Remembrance Day: Celebrated on November 11th in most of Canada, this is a good opportunity to discuss many aspects of Canadian and world history, along with issues such as war, peace, and freedom. Depending on the age of the students, you may want to seek out books or articles on poets such as John McCrae, the author of In Flanders Fields. If you watch the Remembrance Day broadcast from Ottawa, you may also end up discussing topics such as why (on this day vs. others) the Governor-General seems to take a larger role than the Prime Minister.

A Caveat on Free Books

All books currently available in some free online format have been marked as such.

That does not necessarily mean that AmblesideOnline recommends "borrowing" or downloading non-public-domain books. When possible and practical, the most honourable way to thank authors and publishers for their work is to buy new copies.

However, many of us already borrow and buy books, especially out-of-print titles, from secondhand sources, and those sales (or non-sales) do not directly benefit authors either. At the time of this writing (admittedly a strange time in history), our access to libraries and many used sources has also been curtailed. Some people live far away from used bookstores, or have very tight homeschool budgets, so online-and-free may be their only option. Finally, listing online versions here (even if the copyright waters are a bit murky) is a way for educators to at least browse the books recommended. Previewing a couple of chapters or even a few pages may be enough to give a thumbs-up, or possibly down.

Again, where it is possible and you have the means, buy a new book. Otherwise, feel encouraged that it has become possible to explore so many classic and scarce titles through the digital world. (And remember to support those sites as well, if you can.)

Part Two: Weekly Schedules

Notes on the Weekly Schedules: These are designed to be integrated with the existing AmblesideOnline curriculum. The books listed here can act as substitutes for or additions to the standard booklists. Where weeks are "empty," it simply means that there are no changes to be made.


Year 0

Extra Picture Books

There are existing Canadian homeschool resources which make use of picture books, so you may wish to make use of those in the preschool or early elementary years. Some recommended by AO users and on other book lists include:

Up in the Tree, by Margaret Atwood

Mary of Mile 18, by Ann Blades

A Morning to Polish and Keep by Julie Lawson ($)

The Pony Man, by Gordon Lightfoot (hard to find!)

The Sugaring-Off Party by Jonathan London ($)

Have You Seen Birds?, by Joanne Oppenheim and Barbara Reid ($)

A Salmon for Simon, by Betty Waterton ($) (free online at archive.org)

Two by Two by Barbara Reid ($) (online at archive.org) and others, many of which can also be found online.

Selina and the Bear Paw Quilt, by Barbara Smucker ($) (online at archive.org)


Year 1

History Books and Biographies

A Pioneer Story, by Barbara Greenwood (Story plus activities) ($) This book can be found on archive.org under its U.S. title, A Pioneer Sampler.

* For Remembrance Day: In Flanders Fields: The Story of the Poem by John McCrae, by Linda Granfield (this could be saved until Year 2 or 3 ($); you may be able to view it at archive.org). The poem itself is also found in Spirit of Canada, p. 193.

Literature and Legends

Canadian Fairy Tales, by Cyrus Macmillan (online at Project Gutenberg)

Spirit of Canada, edited by Barbara Hehner (online at archive.org)

Free Reading (not scheduled)

The Dog Who Wouldn't Be, by Farley Mowat ($) (online at archive.org; there is an excerpt from this book in Spirit of Canada, p. 204)

Down by Jim Long's Stage: Rhymes for Children and Young Fish, by Al Pittman ($) Another book along the same lines is Whispers of Mermaids and Wonderful Things, edited by Sheree Fitch and Anne Hunt. ($)

The Princess of Tomboso: a fairy-tale in pictures. Based on the story collected by Marius Barbeau and retold by Michael Hornyansky in The golden phoenix (Free on archive.org.)

How the Chipmunk Got its Stripes, by Nancy Cleaver (A version by Joseph Bruchac ($) is free to borrow online archive.org.)

How Summer Came to Canada, by William Toye (Free online at archive.org)

The Mare's Egg, by Carole Spray ($)

Geography: Paddle-to-the-Sea concerns the Great Lakes region and the St. Lawrence River, and is already scheduled throughout the year. ($) (Online at archive.org. A picture book about a journey in the other direction is Hold on, McGinty by Nancy Hartry. ($)

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Year 2

History Books and Biographies: (choose one main textbook from the first three)

Canada's Story by H.E. Marshall (Scanned as part of Our Empire Story at archive.org; also at available Google Books)

Story of Canada by George Brown, Eleanor Harman, and Marsh Jeanneret ($) (available online at archive.org)

The Story of Canada, by Edith L. Marsh (available online at archive.org)

A Pioneer Story, by Barbara Greenwood (continued from Year One)

Optional: Leif the Lucky by Ingri and Edgar Parin d'Aulaire ($)

Optional: Into Unknown Waters: John and Sebastian Cabot by Eric N. Simons

Optional Cartier Discovers the St. Lawrence by William Toye, illustrated by Laszlo Gal: one option for the history readings on Jacques Cartier. A longer option is Cartier Sails the St. Lawrence, by Esther Averill (online at archive.org.).

Literature and Legends: Spirit of Canada, edited by Barbara Hehner (online at archive.org.)

Free Reading (not scheduled):

Owls in the Family, by Farley Mowat ($) (online at archive.org.)

The Olden Days Coat, by Margaret Laurence ($)

Canadian Wonder Tales, by Cyrus Macmillan (online at Project Gutenberg; for those who especially enjoyed Canadian Fairy Tales).

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Year 3

History Books and Biographies: (choose one main textbook)

Story of Canada by George Brown, Eleanor Harman and Marsh Jeanneret (available online at archive.org)

Canada's Story by H.E. Marshall (Scanned as part of Our Empire Story at archive.org; also at available Google Books)

The Story of Canada by Edith L. Marsh (online at archive.org.)

Optional: Madeleine Takes Command by Ethel Brill ($) (free online at archive.org). (NOTE: Madeleine, although well written, requires discussion about its mostly-negative portrayal of Native Canadians.)

Optional: **He Went With Champlain, by Louise Andrews Kent (This is a fairly long book and could be left for a later year)

Literature: (The Adventures of) Sajo and the Beaver People (also titled Sajo and Her Beaver People), by Grey Owl ($) (free online at Project Gutenberg)

Free Reading (not scheduled):

* Pioneer Thanksgiving by Barbara Greenwood ($) (online at archive.org.)

* Pioneer Christmas by Barbara Greenwood (If you read A Pioneer Story last year, you may enjoy these sequels)

** Alphonse, That Bearded One, by Natalie Savage Carlson (online at archive.org.)

** The Talking Cat and Other Stories of French Canada, by Natalie Savage Carlson (online at archive.org.)

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Year 4

Note on History: George Washington's World, by Genevieve Foster, has a misleading title: it covers world history during the lifetime of its main character, so in this case, the 18th century. Much of the U.S. history covered during this period intertwines with that of what would later be the Canadian colonies; so while we may not want to cover Revolutionary heroes in as much depth as American schools do, those events are important to Canadians as well.

History Books and Biographies (choose one main textbook; biographies are optional)

Story of Canada by George Brown, Eleanor Harman, and Marsh Jeanneret (online at archive.org), OR Canada: A New Land, by Edith Deyell OR The Story of Canada by Edith L. Marsh (online at archive.org). Canada's Story by H.E. Marshall (Scanned as part of Our Empire Story at archive.org; also at available Google Books) can be used to a limited extent.

** Mrs. Simcoe's Diary (the wife of governor John Graves Simcoe) provides notes on life in Upper Canada. ($) (Online at archive.org.)

** Joseph Brant: A Man for His People, by Helen Caister Robinson ($) or another of her biographies such as Mistress Molly, the Brown Lady: A Portrait of Molly Brant. ($) An alternative: Prince in Buckskin by Margaret Widdemer.

Literature and Legends:

Spirit of Canada, edited by Barbara Hehner (online at archive.org.)

** Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Longfellow's long poem Evangeline is set during the Expulsion of the Acadians, from 1755-1764 in Nova Scotia; it makes a good readaloud. ($) (Online at Project Gutenberg, and can also be found in audio versions.)

*** The Incredible Journey, by Sheila Burnford (already scheduled on AO) ($)

Free Reading (not scheduled):

Mine for Keeps, by Jean Little ($) (online at archive.org.)

** The Reb and the Redcoats by Constance Savery ($)

*** A Question of Loyalty by Barbara Greenwood ($)

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Year 5

HISTORY NOTE: It's recommended to keep Abraham Lincoln's World by Genevieve Foster as the world history text, unless you have another preferred book. However, if you use a text such as George Brown's Canada in North America (vol. 2) or Edith Deyell's Canada: The New Nation, those do include some U.S. history, too. Another possible combination might be one of the Canadian texts plus Our Island Story (British history). Some users have added or substituted The Great Adventure, by Donalda Dickie, at this level. (Online at archive.org.)

EXTRA NOTE: For the World War I unit at the end of the year, you will probably need a supplementary book, plus other resources covering the period 1914-1918. One possible resource is Story of Canada by Janet Lunn. ($) (Online at archive.org.) The Canadian government offers resources for teachers on this topic, and libraries will also have books on Canada's role in the war.

History Books: Choose one of Story of Canada by George Brown, Eleanor Harman, and Marsh Jeanneret (available online at archive.org) OR Canada in North America 1800-1901 by George Brown, Eleanor Harman, and Marsh Jeanneret (available online at archive.org), OR Canada: The New Nation by Edith Deyell. The first two books are almost identical; the second contains a bit of extra material.

Choose a biography or extra history book:

Joe Howe: The Man Who Was Nova Scotia, by Kay Hill ($)

* Biography of Laura Secord, e.g. Laura's Choice by Connie Crook (retitled Acts of Courage: Laura Secord and the War of 1812) ($), or Laura Secord: Heroine of the War of 1812 by Peggy Dymond Leavey. ($) (Online at archive.org.)

* The Savage River: Seventy-One Days with Simon Fraser, by Marjorie Wilkins Campbell. Other possibilities: The Farthest Shores, by Roderick Haig-Brown; Alexander Mackenzie, Canadian Explorer, by Ronald Syme (online at archive.org); The Map Maker by Kerry Wood (explorer David Thompson)

*** (From) Ocean to Ocean by George Monro Grant. It's described as "the diary of a keen observer who travelled with Sandford Fleming across Canada in 1872 before the transcontinental railway was built." ($) (online at archive.org.)

*** Royal Canadian Mounted Police by Richard L. Neuberger, one of the World Landmark series.; online at archive.org.)

Literature and Legends:

Spirit of Canada, edited by Barbara Hehner (online at archive.org.)

Canadian Crusoes ($) (also titled Lost in the Backwoods), by Catherine Parr Traill. (Three cousins get lost near Rice Lake, Ontario, and survive on their own for many months before they finally make it back home.) There is an excerpt from this book in Spirit of Canada, p. 77. An alternative book by the same author is In the Forest. ($) (Online at Project Gutenberg; all of Traill's books should be online.)

Free Reading (not scheduled):

Lost in the Barrens (also known as Two Against the North), by Farley Mowat ($) (online at archive.org.)

Look Through My Window, by Jean Little (online at archive.org.)

Anne of Green Gables, by L.M. Montgomery, ($) and sequels (There is an excerpt of this book in Spirit of Canada, p. 183; online at Project Gutenberg; all Montgomery's novels should be free online)

* The Red Sash by Jean E. Pendziwol (life at a fur trading post) ($)

** The Last Safe House by Barbara Greenwood (about the Underground Railroad). ($) (Online at archive.org.)

** Underground to Canada, by Barbara Smucker ($) (online at archive.org under the title Runaway to Freedom)

** The Settlers in Canada, by Frederick Marryat (Published in 1844: the adventures of an immigrant family who settle near Lake Ontario; ($) online at Project Gutenberg.)

** The Birchbark House series by Louise Erdrich (about an Ojibwa family living in the Great Lakes region in the late 1800's) ($)

** The Root Cellar, by Janet Lunn (Timeslip novel about the U.S. Civil War; ($) online at archive.org.)

*** Gold Rush Fever: A Story of the Klondike by Barbara Greenwood (about the Yukon Gold Rush; ($) online at archive.org.)

*** Knights of the Air: Canadian Aces of World War I, by John Norman Harris, one of the Great Stories of Canada series

*** Charlie Wilcox by Sharon E. McKay (a young soldier's experiences during WWI. ($) There is a sequel, Charlie Wilcox's Great War. You may want to preview these books before reading them with younger children; they could be left for middle school or later).

*** Rilla of Ingleside by L.M. Montgomery ($) Note: This is scheduled as a Free Read for AO Year 5, since it describes WWI as seen by a Canadian teenager (the daughter of Anne). For those who feel that jumping so far ahead in the Anne series is too much of a spoiler, this book can be saved for later years. (Online at Project Gutenberg.)

Miscellaneous: Already scheduled by AO as nature reading: Wild Animals I Have Known by Ernest Thomas Seton. ($) Science biography of Alexander Graham Bell (interesting to Canadians because of the time he spent here). ($)

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Year 6, Term One (Terms Two and Three are to be done according to the standard AO booklist)

History Note for Term One: For Term I (20th Century History), you will need to obtain a history spine that moves fairly quickly over the period between 1918-1965 or 1967, or beyond if desired. 1965 is the year in which Canada chose its maple leaf flag, and 1967, the Centennial, was also the year of Expo '67. Janet Lunn and Christopher Moore's Story of Canada, while not recommended for the earlier years, seems to fit the needs for this term, if you have it available. Note: Story of Canada has gone through various revisions, and some may choose to use other resources, so this schedule will give only a general breakdown of the topics.

This is one time period where there is a real need to cover events from a specifically Canadian point of view. Some compromises may need to be made, perhaps by using more videos or magazines than might be ideal (though those would also need to be edited for content), or using Internet sources. Another book to check out is Canada Year by Year, by Elizabeth MacLeod, which covers the period from 1867 to 2017. ($)

History Books and Biographies: As noted above.

Citizenship Suggestion: How to Build Your Own Country, by Valerie Wyatt. ($) From the Kids Can Press website: "Nation-building advice is peppered with examples of events that have shaped countries throughout history, teaching young readers about government, elections, geography and global issues. Backed up with lots of amazing examples of real micronations - some established or ruled by kids - How to Build Your Own Country promises to inspire, entertain and inform young nation-builders."

Literature and Legends: Tales the Elders Told: Ojibway Legends, by Basil H. Johnston ($) (online at archive.org.) OR Legends of my people, by Norval Morrisseau

Spirit of Canada, edited by Barbara Hehner (online at archive.org.)

Free Reading (not scheduled):

The City Under Ground, by Suzanne Martel (online at archive.org.)

The King's Daughter, by Suzanne Martel (about life in New France; ($) online at archive.org; translation of Jeanne, fille du roy; also online at archive.org)

Hey, Dad! ($); You Can Pick me Up at Peggy's Cove ($) (online at archive.org.); Up to Low ($) (online at archive.org.); Angel Square ($) (online at archive.org.), all by Brian Doyle

Incident at Hawk's Hill, by Allan Eckert ($) (online at archive.org.)

Scrubs on Skates, by Scott Young (classic hockey story; ($) online at archive.org.)

Emily of New Moon, by L.M. Montgomery ($) (online at Project Gutenberg.)

The Story Girl, by L.M. Montgomery ($) (online at Project Gutenberg.) and its sequel The Golden Road ($) (online at Project Gutenberg.)

Bluenose: Queen of the Grand Banks, by Feenie Ziner ($) (online at archive.org.)

* Days of Terror by Barbara Smucker (Mennonite immigration to Canada during the Russian Revolution; ($) online at archive.org.)

* Lesia's Dream by Laura Langston (Canadian immigration during WWI; ($) online at archive.org.)

* The Hockey Sweater and Other Stories, by Roch Carrier. ($) Many students will already have read the title story (Spirit of Canada, p. 251), or seen the animated version. However, the whole book seems to fit well with the first term's work in Year Six.

* From Anna, by Jean Little ($) (online at archive.org) and possibly its sequel, Listen for the Singing ($) (online at archive.org.)

* A Child in Prison Camp, by Shizuye Takashima ($) (online at archive.org.) OR Naomi's Road by Joy Kogawa ($) (online at archive.org.). There is an excerpt from Takashima's book in Spirit of Canada, p. 198.

* Hana's Suitcase, by Karen Levine (about the Holocaust; ($) online at archive.org.)

* The Sky is Falling trilogy, also called the Guests of War trilogy, by Kit Pearson (WWII evacuees to Canada; ($) online at archive.org.)

* One Proud Summer, by Marsha Hewitt (1946 millworkers' strike in Quebec) ($)

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Last update April 23, 2020